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View/Open - DSpace Home - The University of the South
—
University
Sewanee's nine fraternities pledged a tairie, La.; Rudolph Jones, Brunswick,
ecord total of 1G6 freshmen and new Tenn.; Thomas Stanley Kandul. Jr.,
;tudents at the close of rush
Jo Faculty
Sewanee
starts
year
new members on the facThree of the new instructors
Nu
Sewanee graduates.
with eight
Replacing Mr. Joe Jones in the Spanis Mr. T. R. Rogerson.
ish department
bom
Rogerson was
Boston and spent
in
of his life in Forest Hills, N. Y.
Graduating from Queens College, he
did graduate work at the University
mos t
He
Wisconsin for an M.A.
f
is
more than
this
Alpha Tau Omega's 19 new pledges
Thomas
are:
I.
Aldinger,
Charleston.
David Charles Conner, Metairie,
David A. Elliott, Meridian, Miss.;
S, C.j
La.;
Englewood, N. J
William W. Haden, Henderson ville, N.
C; Buist Lucas Hanahan, Charleston,
S. C; William Evans Hannum, EndiY.; Theodore D. Hazen, Lake
111.;
C, E. Kells Hogan, MeEllis,
;
working for a doctorate there. Rogerson has specialized in medieval Span-
he speaks
In addition to Spanish,
ish.
Portuguese and French, and reads Lat-
German,
in,
as
two
as
stay
to
W. R. Norsek, who graduated
Sewanee in 1956. Prior to com-
;
The
LXXVI, No.
Vol.
Organ of
Official
the Students of
Ackland Jones succeeds
J-
To Cop Second Game
in the biology department
He graduated from Sewanee with a
Jones was born
B.S. degree in 1956.
This is his first
in Alexandria, Va.
He
teaching position.
Dorn
Mr. T. F.
is
expected to join
is
ROTC
Faculty
Novem-
pass-mterccptic
altie
Walter Wilder then broke the score-'
with a TD toss to Tullahoma's
fleet Dale Ray.
It was the feature play
afternoon for
of a very successful
Wilder in the airlanes. Following the
touchdown. Andy Finlay's boot split
Grows
less tie
Capt Batten and Capt. Feeney have
Capt.
the AF ROTC faculty.
Batten was born in Welch, W. Va.,
Duke
he graduated
He
pre-med.
where
with a B.A. in
did one year of graduate
in a dozen
including Waco, Texas, and
Batten has served
work.
U. S. bases,
Panama
He served
City, Fla.
1952
in
University,
1951
in
and
1953.
Apart
in Korea
from the
Command, he has seen serwith SAC, flying F-84's and with
Air Defence Command, flying F-
Training
vice
the
Batten
94's.
married and has a
and a son, two. Capt
is
daughter, four,
M. Feeney
E.
the
ROTC
is
the other addition
Feeney
faculty.
is
tc
a native
Alabama. He attended college at Georgia Tech and received a
B.S. in civil engineering. Feeney served
in China, Burma, and India in maintainance positions during World War II.
For the last three years he has been
in Japan. Feeney is married and h;
a four-year-old boy and a two-yearof
north
old girl.
Professors
Cheston
and
rc
nflicted
the
Majo
loose ball at the 21 to give the Tigers
possession.
the
Smith
the forestry department
in
his master's degree at the Yale fores-
school
try
this
summer.
This
game but were unable
arc-
Mr. R. H. Hogan and Mr. C. J Wray.
Mr. Hogan, a native of Portland, Ore.,
has lived most of his life in Memphis
He graduated from the forestry department of Sewanee in 1953 and obtained
is
his
Wins PBK Scholarship Cup;
KA
Make
Thirteen Students
Kappa Alpha won
pa
of
the Phi Beta
Kap-
trophy for the spring
scholarship
teaching position, although he has semester
first
an overall
with
1956-57
ninth,
2.307.
win
as re-
4.00
PGD, 2.169; and Independents,
The all men's average was 2.489.
Thirteen
to
sounding a victory on the scoreboard
as they did on the statistical sheet. The
(Continued on page 3)
students,
including
Evett, Beall, Werlein
SMA
Instruct at
seven
Three senior English majors in the
done a year's work in industrial fores- scholastic average of 2.83. One four- graduating seniors, made 4.00 (all "A")
Hogan is not married. Mr. Wray, point man, along with ten other mem- averages. They were Henry Arnold college are currently acting as regular
try.
English instructors at the Military
from Lakeport, Calif., received his B.S. ber with averages from 3.5 to 3.99, (S), Olin Beall, Daryl Confill, Charles
Academy. They are Dave Evett and
from Washington State College and did helped boost the KAs to the top.
Cooper, Bernic Dunlap, Bob Greene,
graduate work at
his
M.N.
sons;
Succeeding
Purple Sports Editor
Three plays netted only
nine yards, bringing up a fourth and
one situation on the 12. Halfback
Frank Mullins swept right end on the
next attempt and although hit hard
the uprights to make the halftime
by the defenders, pounded his way
across the goal line for the second
lewanee wrapped it up in the third marker.
Finlay's conversion was again
iod when Millsaps fumbled a punt
successful.
ip in their own territory. Al Wade
The visitors were in good scoring poles and Duff Green pounced on the
sition several other times during
joined
and attended
MIKE WOODS,
By
Sewanee's fighting Tigers won their second consecutive football
the season last Saturday in Ja
washed the Millsaps Majors, 14-0. Playing in c
Tigers marched
n\ line early
of
a Sigma Nu.
chemistry department in
E.
1957
9,
Tigers Blank Millsaps
Dr.
Berkeley
J.
University of the South
the University, he taught at the
Ph.D. next year.
the
The
SEWANEE, TENNESSEE. OCTOBER
1
Camden Academy, Camden, S. C. Norsek intends to begin work toward a
Mr-
in.;
ny,
Sewanee
Mr.
to
Alan Kent Stagg, Deer Lodge,
Sam S. Swann, Asheville, N.
Darwin Dennis Terry, Munich, Gerand East St. Louis, 111.; Park
E. Ticer, Jr., Alexandria, Va.; and GarTucker, III, Shreveport, La.; Maurice Louis Thomas, Corpus Christi, Texas; eth M. Ward, Memphis, Term.
Henry Unger, Westminster, Md.; and and Walter Scott Welch, III, Vicksburg.
Kappa Alpha's 19 pledges are: MichLarry S. Varnell, Jr., Sewanee.
ael W. Brandon, Wichita Falls, Texas;
Miss.
Beta Theta Pi's 20 pledges arc; DaDelta Tau Delta's 19 pledges arc: William O. Britt, Savannah, Ga.; C.
vid A. Adams, Murfreesboro, Tenn.; Kelly B. Boon, Muskogee, Oklo.; John Dwight Cathcart. Jr., Columbia, S. C;
Paul Harris Bailey, Cleveland, O.; Har- F. Borders, Tifton, Ga.; Richard D. Robert S. Cathcart, Charleston, S. C;
ry B. Bainbridge, 111, Oak Ridge, Term.; Bowling, New Orleans, La.; Noel L. Reed H. Cecil, Beaumont. Texas; WilTurner Daniel Belser. Homewood, Ala.; Brown, Brentwood, Tenn.; Rex Dean liam McGee Coe, Clarksdale, Miss.;
Fayette Clay Ewing, Greenwood, Miss.; Bushong, Jr., Union City, Tenn.; George William S. Ebert, Greenville, S. C;
Diivid B. Fair, Evansville, Ind.; Robert W. Freeman, Union City, Tenn.; Rob- Thomas M. Goodrum, Coral Gables,
M. Fleming-Jones, Jr., Glen Rock, N. ert T. Gore, Wartrace, Tenn.; Lee D. Fla.; Robert L. Husted, Charlottesville,
J
Claude G. Green, III, Plant City, Haimes, Houston, Texas; James L. Hut- Va.; James W. Hutchinson, DeLand,
Fla.; Charles S. Hess, La Grange, Ga.; ter, HI, Memphis, Tenn.; William H. Fla.; John T. Jones, Bonne Terre, Mo.;
Leonard Wayne Johnson, Holcomb, Jenkins, Washington, N. C; John E. Robert S. Kring, Sao Paulo, Brazil;
Kans.; Thomas Earle Johnson, Jr., Tus- Littlewood, Buzzards Bay, Mass.; Bev(Continued on page 3)
5s.;
America.
at
Augmenting the history department
•
William Lickfield,
ly Daniel McNutt, Jr., Tampa, Fla.;
Chicago, 111.; Benjamin Dean Ma- Jeffrey Paul Schiffmayer, Elgin, HI.;
i,
Fort Valley, Ga.; James Robert Geoffrey
B.
Sewall,
Griswold ville,
has visited
Central
in
Rogerson intends
m
loosa, Ala.; Francis
McPherson,
South American countries
the
of
well
He
Barcelona.
of
virons
C
James
Ga.;
a dialect spoken in the en-
Catalan,
a ll
and
Gallician,
Italian,
Marietta,
Mobile, Ala.;
last year's
led the list with 20 pledges each.
Traditional fraternity festivities marked the Monday, September 30, pledg-
now Fred Kimball
is
12
Phi Delta Theta, and Sigma
Pi,
ulty.
are
week
III,
Edward Rutledge Moore,
Jr., Shaker Heights, Ohio; Byron
high of 154. The size of the Sewanee; Robert P. D. Nesbit, Colum- Douglas McReynolds, Abilene, Texas;
Tenn.; David C. Perry, Bound Roy Gilbert Parks, Jr., Little Rock.
classes of many of the fratcrk, N J.; Thomas S. Tisdale, Jr., Ark.; George M. Rast, Leesburg, Fla;
are larger than usual, and Beta
Orangeburg, S.
C; Joseph Henry James Ralph Stow, Cocoa, Fla.; Robert
This
tear.
centennial
its
Record Number
Fraternities Pledge
Adds Eight
He
is
Duke
University for
married and has three
twins, aged five-and-a-half and
a third boy, three.
In
third,
fifth,
enth.
second
ATO,
KS.
was
place
2.73;
PDT,
DTD,
2.800;
Homer
BTP,
2.563 ;
George McCowen
fourth,
2.522; sixth,
SAE,
eighth,
2.317;
1
Knizley, Richard
Ed Trainer
2.370: sev-
(S),
SN,
and Phil Whitehead
2.307;
(S)
(S),
,
Olin Bealll, who are teaching senior
Knudsen (S),
English, and Halsey Werlein, who is
Danny Ricks teaching
a freshman course. The three
Ralph Troy (S),
(S).
teach one class a day, five days a week.
The three Sewanee men were hired
over the regular teaching duties
of Captain George McCloud. who is
to take
University Celebrates Centennial Anniversary
homes on the lions took place until 1 p.m. followed serts thrice. Molasses was on the taBy BILL
Mountain. Breakfast was served any- by dinner and another two hours of ble at every meal (whether or not on
Purple Features Editor
where from 7 to 7:30 a.m. Morning recitation. At 4 p.m. the afternoon ser- the menu). There were fruits and vegThe opening of the University of chapel was at 8 a.m. Seating was vice was held. It lasted about fifteen etables in seasonable profusion. Freshthe South in this, the Centennial year, the same as it is now, although the minutes and the students were expect- killed rabbit was frequently served.
saw conditions quite unlike those seen chancel with the faculty was called the ed to attend both daily chapel ser- Chicken, eggs, beef, lamb, and pork
when the first nine students matricu- "crows nest." Dogs began their tra- vices. Afternoon sports were followed were plentiful and cheap. By 1872
Study was
lated in 1868.
There were four pro- dition of going to chapel with the first by supper at 6:30 p.m.
ngeral
of
the
The service lasted for from scheduled for the evening. Grammar
fessors and very few buildings. Classes students.
Wednesday and SatThe University of the South has
were held in the Chapel.
fifteen to twenty-five minutes. Recita- school boys had
urday off from 1 to 7:15 p.m. Non- come a long way in the last hundred
gownsmen had only Saturdays free. years. From the minds of three de(
There was a swimming "pool" 76x15x6 termined men has evolved a magnififeet
which had a schedule from
cent institution. It opened after "the"
was probably a war with 2,500 English pounds and a
It
a.m. to 10 p.m.
wooden tank in "Abbo's Alley." There few frame buildings. After a century
was an increasing number of sports it has an endowment of some $8,000,000,
There were various ex- many stone buildings worth over this
Eighteen University students were course quickly and the cadets are now each year.
the amount, and a 10,000 acre campus
hospitalized last week as an outbreak flu-free.
Dr. Keppler announced that sup- three societies named with Greek init- the largest campus in the country. It
°f flu, described
by Dr. Charles B.
hand,
are
on
vaccine
founders
of the University. has produced, and will continue to proof
the
Asian
flu
ials
plies of
Keppl er> University physician, as "nonbegin
as
began
will
(Stephen
Elliott)
Epsilon
innoculation
Sigma
and that
duce, an enormous number of famous,
TURNER
The students
lived in
1
s
1
Hospitalizes Eighteen Students
adequate preparations are
the needed information is
This will probably be
'hus far is nowhere near epidemic pro- disseminated.
sometime in the middle of this week.
Portions,
but is considerably more
The doctor also mentioned the impor'han normal. He ascribes the sickness
of seeing a physician while the
Kepplei-
said
the
soon
number
of
cases
as
brilliant
made and
tance
and
influential
men
the
bad weather and the contagious
flu
is
in
its
earliest stages,
ties
He
Army.
be back December
his teaching du-
will
resume
the second semester of the
until
academic year.
CALENDAR
I
divis
1
of
(
Early Menus Recalled
|
Wednesday, October 10
8 p.m. St. Luke's
Woman's Auxiliary
meeting at home of Mrs. Myers.
Thursday, October 10
11
a.m. Special Chapel Service fol-
site.
Procession
by
lowed
8 p.m. E.
Q_.
B. Meeting.
Group
Music
8 p.m.
Woman's Club
Cornerstone
to
Dr. Charles T. Harri-
Speaker:
of
Sewanee
meets.
Friday. October 11
Football:
SMA
vs.
Memphis Univer-
there at 3 pm.
Saturday, Octoher 12
sity School,
both in
2 p.m. Football: Sewanee vs. MissThe
first group of matriculants numbered issippi College, here.
only nine. This year's group numberMonday, October 14
ed over 240, making a new record en3 p.m. Meeting of Sewanee Woman's
rollment of over 570— a fine way to Club at home of Mrs. McCrady. SpeakReconbeen
contemporary
the church and in other positions.
According to Mr. Chitty's
and sugend the first century. There has
Sewanee, letters written
nature of flu. The Military Academy
gested two precautions, which he rec- struction at
more construction in the last ten years
w as hit by a similar attack recently ognized as nearly impossible here at home in 1874 by John Gass revealed than in the previous ninety. Ever
halls.
served
in
the
meals
type
of
the
and
stay
^d may have been a source of con- Sewanee—get plenty of rest
(Continued on page 4)
twice a week, desturkey
had
They
tagion.
However, the disease ran its out of crowds.
to
the
1
Outbreak of Non- Asian Flu
Asian" hit Sewanee.
presently serving in active duty with
9 but will not
:
Dr.
Scott Bates on
Wednesday, October 16
Board of Regents Meeting.
Victors - And Laurels
Centennial
Sl|?
Reflections
Sewanee
is
a hundred years old. This
centennial year, our year of marvels.
is
our
is
the
It
g>?watw £>tm?
The biggest news of the week is to be found
our page one sports story. Coach Shirley
Majors and the Sewanee Tigers, in two brilli.
ant victories over Howard and Millsaps, have
demonstrated that they are dependent neither
on subsidizd athletes nor required freshman
attendance to be successful. What is required
in
year of Chapel construction, the year of the
Sewanee symposia, the year of our greatest
evidently is a month of man-killing practice
and a kind of all-consuming determination
It is high time
(and has been for sei
years) to re-evaluate the football situation at
Sewanee. Football is not in the category
casual extracurricular activities.
It
is a v
carious expression of the student body by me
enrollment.
Sewanee
life
does not seem
much changed by
,
accident. Life
chronological
this
much
pretty
in its petty pace.
gym
our deluxe
the cut system
the one
On
on
goes
still
On
completed.
is
hand
especially talented
the other
From Gailor Hall comes the ominous murmur of student grumbles and stomach
Already we are well into another
rumbles.
the Union.
To
huge
the
usual
its
our
we
team, but
ourselves
is
it
a
i
are
whole
intimately
lot
in-
easier on us
We share in the glory of our
happily avoid the pulled muscles
non-athletes.
Ideally, our support of the team need have
nothing to do with whether or not it is vie
But it's so much more fun when it
is.
And this year it is. We can no better express our gratitude and enthusiasm for what
the Tigers have done this year than by a fullscale and vociferous attendance at the Mississippi College game here Saturday.
us the right to in-
gives
seniority
you to do things we never did. Be humbe good pledges, wear Ivy ties, and read
The New Yorker.
we
Only
life.
Purple extends
struct
ble,
the conformity
can revert to plain egotism. Sewanee,
It
school,
welcome and pompous ad-
officious
Our
vice.
class of 1961 the
Alma Mater, Sewanee or
to
stinct.
volved.
year of the inscrulable enigma of Sewanee
interested.
This idea should shape our concept of "supporting the team." Student support of the football
team should not stem from a fluffy attachment
worse than ever. Beer is up
and Cokes are a dime at
is
thirty-five cents
to
and courageously
torious.
Conform.
But a much more adequate statement than
necessary— and not only to the freshmen.
this is
Bishop Mitchell presented us with that stateI think, in his remarkable address to the
the Editor
ment,
Letter
opening convocation of the University. He reminded us of what the centennial year itself
should remind us of— that Sewanee is a consecrated institution. Now consecration has nothing to do with worth or goodness or practical
virtue. It docs have something to do with purSewanee's accomplishment
pose, with intent.
We're Happy
To Hear It
rightly a matter for considerable
is
and
i
lively
Have been a subscriber
Its consecration, its purpose, is quite
as set forth in the purple prose of
the University Senate on pages ten and eleven
debate.
that
I
get
all
discover the basis of our excellence,
if
we
Rush week
Any
attempt to discover the basic nature of
Sewanee must begin with an investigation of
the basic nature of the liberal arts. The entering freshman finds a fantastic mythology awaiting him. His personality is compartmentalized
fit
five ludicrously taut traditions so that his
table
manners are either southern or military
his dress either Anglican or Oxonian, pre-
He
learns that in this unqualified-
community the coat and tie is not
an outward and visible sign but probably spirOnly two or three years
itual grace itself.
later does he begin to see that what is enduring about Sewanee is a liberal arts education.
ly Christian
So our centennial calls upon us to compare
the elements of our consecration of a hundred
years ago with the real-life Sewanee of today.
We are invited to investigate the Sewanee liberal arts.
Now a good simple-minded definition of the liberal arts is one which is no definition at all: arts, or inquiries, which are liberal.
Liberal would be a very good word if anyone
knew what it meant. I take it to mean, qualifiedly, free.
We are granted a freedom with so
many
strings attached as to
make
it
at
Sewanee, or the Greek Masque
Dear
'The authority of those who teach is very
an impediment to those who desire to
often
The first time we read these words we
might think they had been uttered by some disappointed and disgruntled undergraduate. But
no, the quotation is from the distinguished Roman Consul, Marcus Tullius Cicero, master of
Latin prose, and in all his actions an ornament
to the Republic. Apparently Cicero, like many
other people, had teachers who "got in his way,"
who did not share his interests, and who were
unsympathetic with his aspirations. But he overcame this handicap, as posterity can attest; and
who taught him no one now remembers or
cares. It has been pointed out that a teacher
might say with pride "I taught Mr. So-and-So,"
but he could hardly say "I educated him." Every educated man is self-educated, the teacher
being merely the "means by which." We have
an idea that many great men encountered the
same impediment as Cicero, and got their edulearn."
cation in spite of their teachers.
Such
difficul-
give a man at least one advantage: his
education is his own, and not a mere echo.
ties
when
a student enrolls in
The
if
college or university he finds himself
caught up at once in the toils of an academic
bureaucracy, almost like an octopus in its re-
ican
He
grasp.
lentless
catalogued;
is
classified,
incipient
his
ability
categorized,
is
measured
against an inert and impersonal chart; his aca-
demic standing
equated with a mathematical
formula. In short, his identity as a human being
is eclipsed by the mechanics of the system.
Happily no Sewanee man is ever reduced to
a
mere
is
statistic.
With the memory
reflect that
—
—
—
^urplf
i>ttoanrr
Battle Searcy
Ma nasi nil
Edit
t
and
Eric Naylor
Business Manager
Editor
Editoi
Sports, and Features:
Mike DeMarko,
Arras, Zell Hoole, Jim Clupp, Anthony
ws.
.lack
Mike Woods
Bill
Sports Editor
Turner
Feature Editoi
Copy Editor
Don Sandehs
Proof Editor
Dale Sweeney
Assistant Business Manage/
Bob Crbvelinc
Advertising Manager
Wendell Moody
Circulation Managei
Clay Ewinc
Sewanee knew this
wanee still knows it,
we
a
I
Williams, Bob Thomas, Jim
Barton, Rudy Jones. AI Elmore, Stu Elliott,
Jim Scott, Buck Council, Wes Benson.
Walch,
Robert
iy and Proof: Paul Goddard, Tate Greenwald,
David Lindsav, Gradv Richardson, Bob Adam ., David Johnson, Benny Matthews.
think.
As
the heirs of
we
are morally obliged to be ever mindful not only of
our past and of our present but of the ordered
relation between the two. We must resolve to
do so
this year.
,KE-Uf and Headlines: Charles Hoflan,
dolph
ss
Photographer
JVF
Dave
Parker,
Staps:
Da
e
Littler.
Little
Jimim
Hart
,
Ron-
Mutter,
Applcflate,
vne Hiimmet
Mike Tarbottoo, Scotty
Dan Bel er. Char ie Cooper, Frank
mbert, George Kikcr. R ger Whitehorat.
,
elch,
hundred years ago. Se-
so vigorously claim
extremely pleased
and new
hope
to
live
— in
up
to hear fro
our centennial
your confidenc
this
to
us.—Ed.
A Statement
Of Policy
The Purple calls itself the official organ
of the University, and although
ownership is more mystical than legal, we
think it is still primary. At the same time we
recognize (during our centennial as never bei
ihe students
this
perhaps) our obligation to the academic
in general and to Sewanee friends
and alumni everywhere.
fore
community
Our general policy is that of tradition. On
pages one and four we give general news, items
campus
of
interest,
we
verified to the best of
hope, which have
our ability for their
been
cor-
rectness of detail. Page three is reserved for
sports stories, roundups, and forecasts.
Bylined reviews, columns, and feature stories which
be found on these pages are not
but matters of individual interpretation
i
which you are invited to accept or reject
you choose.
Page two is our editorial page, and it
this page more than any other that can make
the Purple truly the voice of the student bodyViews expressed on the editorial page should
represent the mature thought of the campus c
any topic, mundane or esoteric. We invite (an
is
1
is clearly distinct from magic. It cannot
produce all the answers. But if it does not
change and mold your ability to ask the right
questions, it is failing. It is not being liberal.
cation
in
is
—old
We
be truthful, implore) you to contribute to the
page as often as you are so moved.
will be happy to print all material brought
forth in good faith.
Feel free to take exception, vigorously and at length, to anything on
the editorial page that offends you and thai
you think requires answering. This year's edito
News
Bon Gheene
Fred Jones
Sewanee edu-
friends
year.
stories
we
itself.
its
may
z
liberal
never can be an end in
The Purple
of registra-
mind, it is pleasant to
our students filled out—on the average only about twenty cards if we count the
strip card as one
and made, on all of them
combined, fewer than a hundred entries.
But if things are not too bad here at Sewanee, they were once good all over; witness, if
you will, Dr. Harrison's acount of his registration in the Graduate School at Harvard, Fresh
from Tuscaloosa he met in Cambridge a kind
and helpful professor, such a man, one imagines,
as Dr. Harrison himself, who at once put him
at ease.
The professor asked a few questions,
made some notes on the back of an envelope;
and when the interview was over. Dr. Harrison
tion fresh in everyone's
a responsi-
are to use them with
mind is not one that
despises the past. It is rather one that understands the past. It is not one that preaches a
gospel of the new and the different but rather
one that is not afraid of change.
stumbling blocks
Sir:
I
—
—
the trust
.
Abbots Serapbook
bility.
It is a freedom to interpret our past
and our traditions. Now traditions can be very
fine and very full things, but they are not
dogma. In particular, we have many wonderful
traditions at Sewanee. They are part of a grand
and again I use the word advisedly consecrated heritage. They are not and cannot become
right reason.
.
I have
only recently become familiar wil
your distinguished sheet, and I don't wish
are
indeed excellent. We cannot do this, I think,
merely by reciting Rhodes Scholarship statistics or repeating the findings of the Ford Foundation or examining the average per capita donations of southern Episcopalians. There is no
pat formula for genius.
ferably both.
.
J,
So our job during the centennial festivities
does not end in lauding and repeating the aims
and objectives of the founding fathers. It only
begins there. Our task is rather to attempt an
enlightened appraisal of Sewanee as it is, to
and
Purple
Bayard Snowden
Memphis, Tennessee
of the catalogue.
to
to the
want to quit now, so please
the issues for the year.
1899 and don't
explicit
Assistant Managing Editor
LLOYD Elie
The Sewanee Purple
students
of
the
It.
published by the
ods. Subscript
University of the South,
year, $1.50 pe
is
Sewanee, Tennessee, every Wednesday ex-
re $3.00 per school
tend
*
1946, ot the
r.
The Puhplb was
cla s
matter Feb. IS,
Sewanee, Teno.
est office ot
editorial
We
orial staff
is
notoriously opinionated.
So if you are upset about the canine situaUnion prices, or the Russian satellite;
you wish to laud the construction program, the
student waiters, or the rift of dawn; if you feel
moved to say something ambiguous about mother, home, and country
please do so. As a mattion,
if
—
ter
basic
and
few
justice,
to
the
ordered
procession of wrath
you are morally obliged to check 3
But after that the press s
yours.
Address all correspondence to the Sewanee Purple, SPO. Just be sure to sign yoii r
facts
first.
>
THE SEWANEE PURPLE, OCTOBER
—The Stovepipe League•
SHADES OF
By
By Mikb Woods
ning to eight o'clock class at five minutes after through ankle-deep gravel,
our arm motion hampered by big black
gowns; struggling up the obstaclestrewn staircases of Walsh; fighting for
but the smiles are a little forced. Subbalance as we pick our way across the
consciously we expect any day to find
treacherous slopes of the art gallery;
out we've had to forfeit the games be- clambering down the bluff
to Magnolia.
cause Pensinger had one too many If these activities aren't enough, the
cleats in his left shoe or because Wilder administration has provided us with
has an illegal extra bone in his right countless others through a remarkable
But this is extension of the athletic facilities over
wrist (like Li'l Abner).
understandable. We're unaccustomed to the summer.
Passing under the batwinning, and we're not quite sure of tlements of Juhan Memorial Gymnas-
Shades of '99! Sewanee is undefeated
and unscored-on with one fourth of
ihe season completed! Things are lookto one another cheerily,
ing up, we say
way
proper
Or perhaps ium, we
to react.
we've got the knack of losing gracefully down so pat, we're reluctant to
ming
find an Olympic-sized
swim-
pool, a gigantic basketball court,
handball courts, bowling alleys, shooting ranges,
and who knows what all
catacombs of that
subterranean
the
where it's due edifice contain? There are uncharted
sure where it is regions of Juhan Memorial that no man
e credit
we only knew
—if
Partially,
due.
ent
for
of course,
to the
tal-
partially,
of course,
to
Purple Sports Editor
The Tigers gave new Coach Shirley
Majors a 25-0 victory in the season's
?r against Howard.
Walt Wilder
and Andy Finlay shared scoring honn the game played on rain-soaked
Hardee Field.
The Purple penetrated to the Howd thirty-yard line in the first quar•r
before losing the ball on downs.
Then late in the same period Wilder
punted out of bounds on the Howard
md the visitors soon kicked back
f apparent danger to their 38. On
the second play of the ensuing series,
ver. Wilder took off behind perilockmu mikI went 38 v.. ids down
moxie
of
his
staff;
but we're inclined to think
ise.
quarter
ond
their final score
quarter after guard Harold Elmer recovered a Howard fumble
on the Bulldog 20. Wilder went the
last four yards to paydirt, bringing the
score to 25-0.
the
sses
yards to hike the Purple point total to
19.
Later in the same period Mullins'
the key
tally,
figt
twisting 52-yard punt return
fied
was
nulli-
by a clipping penalty.
The Tigers added
tail-
back Frank "Moon" Mullins. He knifed
through for good yardage on every attempt. Once, when the drive appeared
italled on a fourth down situation deep
n Howard territory, Mullins gained
nore than enough yardage for the
irst down.
With the ball on the
Finlay plunged over for the first
o touchdowns. The point-after
attempt was unsuccessful, leaving the
in the fourth
The
excellence
of
Sewanee's
line
is demonstrated by the fact that
their opponents gained only five yards
play
<
rushing
all
afternoon.
The
wing
single
was clicking during most of the
and in general Coach Majors*
debut at Sewanee was an auspicious
offense
contest,
Strong Second Hnlf
Tigers Trip
Andy Finlay grabbed a third
Howard pass and galloped 20
second period a series ol
enabled Howard to move intc
territory.
The drive wa;
halted when end "Hoot" Gibson fell or
a fumble at the 31-yard line. The Tioiled 69 yards for their secIn
iwanee
ore at half-
The Tigers returned
to the field
Majors 14-0
With Defense
We
in
thought you might be interested
the story of
how
a sports
column
Coach Shirley Majors and gets
the
25-0
the second half with an improved pass
of the year.
knows.
and determination of our purple-
clad gridsters;
Howard
STEWART ELLIOTT
tssistant
BIG
I'urplc Sports Editor
the
1957
Tigers Defeat
'99!
GYM
.JUHAN
9,
its name.
At the outset we
determined to get our name ir
.
the
Al-
j
though outweighed by Millsaps in the
some 15 pounds to the man, Sewanee kept the home team in their owi
half of the field on every occasion ex
cept one. The defensive secondary wa:
equally brilliant, as the Majors failed
to complete a pass and had threi
Responsible for the aerial
out for being too old hat, e.g., The tercepted.
Armchair Quarterback, Sportalk, etc. pilfering were Wilder, Steve Pensingi
We finally settled on one which, if not and Dennis Thompson.
Coach Majors said that "the boys felt
original or traditional either,
is
at
least in keeping with the noisesomc like they should have scored n
but that he was very satisfied with
their showing.
"It was a team game.
(we're
all
named Woods, you
line
ki
the spirit of a hundred years but several suggestions were deemed
the spirit of those demi-gods of unworthy of the dignity of the Purple,
,ii;o,
yesteryear, the founders. At any rate, Things like Woods and Stream, Good
the chaplain is delighted: he does so Woods on the Ball, Woodshavings
you
love to ring the bells.
Othei
thn
to
ing
—
to us the other
weren't for the unhealthy
The thought occurred
day that
if it
amount of alcohol consumed by Sewanee students, they might be among
the most physically fit of the nation.
Statistics:
Sewanee Fraternities Pledge 154
From Entering Freshman Class
Statistics:
Sewanee
First
downs
Yards rushing
Yards passing
Passes attempted
Passes completed
Score by periods:
mey, Erlanger, Ky.; Richard R. Randolph, III, Birmingham, Ala.; Barney
Reagan, Aroma Park, 111.; John K
Rothpletz, Dallas, Texas; Robert Nel- Sewanee
William E. Prewitt, HI, Atlanta, Ga.; son Rust, III, Arlington, Va.; Joseph
Charles L. Pueschel. Lake City, Fla.; H. Schley, Jr.; Dallas, Texas; Welcom.
Sterling M. Rayburn, Coral Gables, H. Shearer, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.; Ben
Fla.; and K. Wortham Smith, Bay City, jamin Smith, III, Athens, Ala; Ned S
(Continued from page 1)
Frank T. Melton, Columbia, S. C;
Randolph Parker, Charleston, S C;
Wililiam A. Powe, Charlottesville, Va.;
Thompson, Houston, Texas; Thomas
Kappa Sigma's 17 pledges are: Wil- Cobb Tierney, Wichita, Kans.; and Miliam C. Broadhurst, Crowley, La.; Jon chael Arne Watt, Atlanta, Ga.
Texas.
Campbell, Jr., Natchez, Miss.; EwEverett Carruthers,, Charleston, S.
Michael Chandler. Carthage, Texas;
Ronald B. Dowd, Dallas, Texas; Jay E.
Frank, San Marcos, Texas; Jan Ronald
Guy, Sweetwater, Texas; Wiley Johnson, Jr., Dallas, Texas; Tracy Rives
Moore, Monroe, La.; Walter Gene MulIms, Chickasha, Okla.; Ben L. Paddock,
Fort Smith,
George William
Ark.;
Parker, III, Fort Worth, Texas; Grady
W. Richardson, Jr., Birmingham, Ala.;
Barry H. Thompson, Jackson, Tcnn.;
Anthony P. Walch, Sedalia, Mo.; David
Winslow Wilson, Kansas City, Kans.;
and James Clark Wood, Jr., Little Rock,
C.
ing
C
,
Millsaj
10
4
144
85
Intramural ProgramStarts
With Fraternities Vying
98
12
8
8
7
7
Meeting
BOB THOMAS
By
One
Caldwell Calls
at 7
Phi Gamma Delta's 15 pledges are
Swimming coach Hugh Caldwell has
David H. Bell, Dover, Del.; Alan A
Bergeron, Birmingham, Ala.; Bobby announced that the team will have
Joe Bertrand, Pulaski. Tenn.; Garbutt junior varsity in addition to the reguJames Brown, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla. lar first line squad of last year.
Caldwell said that some 50 boys reM. Keith Cox, Amarillo, Texas; Elwood
Headley. Jr., Madison, Tenn.; Michael ported last year and that the team wa:
G. S. Hesse, Ridgewood, N. J.; W. Jay simply unable to accommodate them
Jones, San Antonio, Texas; Robert E. all. He hopes to rectify the situation
Libbev, Belvidere, N. J.; Robert P. Li- with a second team that will compete
kon, Rockledge, Fla.; H. Edward Mill- with prep schools and freshman
He expressed a wish
:>f other colleges.
er, Jr., Huntsville, Ala.; Robert P. Radthat anyone wishing to represent the
Lawrence, Kans.; Robert
cliffe,
Steeves, San Angelo, Texas; Ed Mont- university in swimming would be abb
gomery Tucker, Wichita, Kans.; and to do so. All boys interested are asked
James R. Wisialowski, West Hollywood, to report for an organizational meet
;
1
W
Ark.
ing tonight at seven o'clock in th
Fla.
Phi Delta Theta's 20 pledges are:
Sigma Alpha Epsilon's 17 pledges are: physics lecture room.
Paul C. Alvarez, Houston, Texas; M.
The splashers have lost only two let
Fred R. Freyer, Jr., Coral Gables, Fla.;
John Arras, Greenwood, Miss.; W. Ftaymond Albert Goodwill, Jr., Fort termen from last year's successful
Fields Bailey, Jr., Dothan, Ala.; Rhodes
Lauderdale, Fla.; Ronald Dee Gray, III, team, and Coach Caldwell said hi
Senunes Baker, Houston, Tex.; Peter Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.; Richard Gor- pected the squad to be "a lot stronger."
A. Bickel, Dallas, Texas; W. Thomas
Matches have already been scheduled
don Holloway, Atlanta, Ga.; Harrison
Bums, Houston, Texas; Robert James L. Holmes, Greenwood, Miss.; Charles with Eastern Kentucky, Kentucky,
n, Eureka, 111.; John W. B. Kelley, HI, Fort Lauderdale, Fl;
Vanderbilt, Emory, Clemson, The CitaJr., Birmingham, Ala.; Robert Richard
del,
and Georgia Tech. Tentative
Cunliffe McBee, Greenwoc
John Rogers Ra- Miss.; Robert Dandridge Moore, Mem- matches are with Birmingham -Southphis, Tenn.; Kenneth Alexander Mor- ern, Tennessee, and Tennessee Tech
Herschel,
Morgan,
Sewanee's
of
best
handball,
features
is
cross country, track,
swim-
ming, and badminton.
intramural program.
The first of these sports in which we
All of the fraternities are represented, will be given an opportunity to comwith additional teams coming from the pete will be football. Last year the
her
outstanding
School of Theology and from the As- touch football season was dominated
sociation of Independent Men.
This by three teams: SAE, which finished
makes a total of eleven teams for each
first, PDT, runner-up of the league, and
sport, and a full schedule for each
ATO, third. This year's competition
team.
The program is designed to
shows some promise of being balanced
allow an opportunity for team compemuch better, with last year's weak
tition in athletics for each student of
teams being bolstered by large pledge
the University.
All physically
students are urged to participate.
able
Football gets under way this week,
program
scheduled for 3:50 pjn.
most of the popular varsity with all games
at the Intramural Field.
sports plus some sports which receive
only minor varsity recognition in the
schools of the nation. Sewanee's ma-
The
sports covered by this
include
intramural sports are touch
jor
balll,
THE MOTOR MART
foot-
basketball, volleyball, tennis, soft-
and
minor in
ball,
golf.
The
sports regarded as
intramural
competition
are
TERRILL'S
TEXICO SERVICE
P. S.
BROOKS & CO.
SERVICE STATION — GARAGE
TAXI SERVICE
"We Insure Our Passengers"
Sewanee, Tennessee
Phone
51f>:
D. Peel, Paris. Tenn.;
JANEYS~
SHELL STATION
BANK
OF^
Jacksonville, Fla.; E. Daniel
New-
ris,
erick B. Brewer, Charleston. S. C
ton, Memphis, Tenn.; Paul Lee Prout,
Michael F. Caton, Lutz, Fla.; H. SanEutaw, Ala.; Blake Collins Reed, Jr.,
born Chamberlain, rV, Lookout MounWebster Groves, Mo.; Milhado L. ShafCrathorne
Tenn.; Wayne H.
tain,
fer, Houma, La.; Jerry A. Snow
Coeur d'Alleine. Idaho: Douglas J. Daberlville, Ala.; William Richard Swinvid, El Paso, Texas; Edgar E. EtheAlfred
M.
Pensacola,
Fla.;
ford,
Felder J.
Jr.. Pampa. Texas;
ridfie,
Waddell, Memphis, Tenn.; and Edwin
Frederick. Ill, Marshal lville, Ga.; BurD. WiUiamson, Darlington, S. C.
ton D. Glover, Springfield, Tenn.; HowSigma Nu's 20 pledges are: Laurence ard H. Haworth, Jr.. Birmingham, Ala.;
H. Andrus, Pensacola, Fla.; Harold C. Max McCord, Jr., Louisville, Ky.; John
Baker. Jr., Staten Island, N Y Fred- L. McLean, Jr., Russellville, Ky.; Wal;
SEWANEE'
CLARK, President
ROSS SEWELL, Vice-President
J. F. MERRITT, JR., Cashier
Your Business Appreciated
M. Moore, Anniston, Ala.; Michael
Pugh, Tullahoma, Tenn.; Cec
Rogers, Jr., Meridian, Miss.; Danford
L. Sawyer. Jr., Sarasota, Fla.; Aai
E. Smith, El Dorado, Kans.; Samuel
D. Stoney, Jr., Columbia, S. C;
Lynn C. Wright. Birmingham, Al
ter
SOLOMON'S
H. E.
ESSO SERVICE STATION
COWAN, TENNESSEE
D.
WIN A STEAK DINNER
— for
Claramont
utstanding
excellent food,
Staff c
atmosphere— that the Pubple Adverti:
it.
If you can find the words, write next week's advertisement yourself and submit it to the cashier at Claramont before midnight
Saturday. If your advertisement is selected for use, you win one of Miss
Clara's famous steak dinners.
pleasant
•
to describe
CLARAMONT
CLARA AND TOM SHOEMATE
MONTEAGLE
TENNESSEE
.
THE SEWANEE PURPLE. OCTOBER
-l)i
I'RE
9,
1957
JONES-
University
Pic of Flicks
W.'dn.
October
,
9:
Portrait
oj
films
action
fisted
Notes Years
should
be
happy.
former Pic-of-Flics Great,
Besides,
John Fleming, describes it as a gloriappearance of a ghostly sprite. Jenni- ous paean to the peon.
Saturday and Monday, October 12,
fer Jones, to a painter, Joseph Cotton.
Cotten, who is completely smitten with 14: Boy on o Dolphin concerns a Greek
the enigma, is somewhat bugged be- sponge diver, Sophia Loien, who finds
cause the girl is never around long n valuable statue on a sunken ship.
enough to sit for a portrait. The movie The plot, about as basic as Sophia herefforts of a good
is not too good, but it has its moments. self, deals with the
Sharing the bill is Toy Tiger, about a archaeologist, Alan Ladd, and a bad
repulsively arch little boy, Tim Hovey. art dealer, Clifton Webb, to get the
ntagc Selznick film, des-
cribes at
some length the continued
re-
Neither of the effete- looking
cunningly goes about uniting the statue.
two, however, pay nearly as much attention to Sophia who, unlike the plot,
Thursday, Friday, October 10. 11: is magnificently constructed The whole
God is My Partner falls into the cate- thing ends in an appallingly garish
(Due to
gory (or abyss) of God Movies in burst of Greek nationalism
which the Almighty is always moving the Cinema Guild presentation Monaround in mysterious ways to reward day night, Boy on a Dolphin will be
the good, drab little people. In this shown only at the matinee.)
Monday night, October 14: At 7:30
one, Walter Brennan, a Kind Doctor, is
hauled into court by his scheming ne- and 9: SO the Cinema Guild will present
phews (secularism), who want to Brief Encounter, an extremely sensiprove that the old man, who has been tive and poignant story of an extrathrowing his money around among the marital relationship between two perPoor, is incapable of handling his fi- fectly decent people in England. Trevor
who
hero, Jeff Chandler, and the heroine,
Laraine Day. It is dreadful.
Howard and Celia Johnson are feaAnd
(Owl Flick)
The tured, and both give eloquent perform Friday night
week's best is Elia Kazan's Vi
Sunday and Tuesday, October 13 and
which has made
Baffle Hymn stars Rock Hudson
an owl flick before. Marlon Brando is 15:
the Mexican revolutionist leader of the in a story ripped from the flaming
Rock
pages
of the Reader's Digest.
are
Anthony
title, and also in the cast
Quinn, Jean Peters, and Joseph Wise- plays a dreg-low-Protestant preacher
man. The story, written by Steinbeck, who. when the Korean War erupts, rehas several serious points to make, but enters the Air Force and grimly pept
Of Progress
(Continued from page
1)
since the opening of the University, the
Chapel has been expanding. At long
Sewanee will have a Chapel adequately large to accommodate all of
the SMA cadets and University students there should be now no students turned from the Chapel door
during the University's second century. This fine Gothic specimen will
be the spiritual centre of the University and a monument to the everlasting glory of God.
last
—
Sewanee has been growing
nown because
of
its
in
good
SEWANEE SUMMER HIGHLIGHT:
ceives an honorary D.C.L. degree
Bishops here.
The have the advantage
House of
graduates.
University's being host to the
Bishops was an excellent chance
spread the
throughout
re-
name
of
dur
of participating in
the celebration of the Centennial. Thery
to
Sewanee
We
the entire church.
should get an even greater influx of
non-Southern students because of the
recommendations of the bishops who
attended the meeting.
The present student body is the most
fortunate in the history of Sewanee. We
pata,
will
be more
activities, guest speakers,
his
We
will
be the
first
to use
buildings.
There will be those valuable experiences which we will not
realize as such at present, but will be
able to reflect upon in the years to
come. The University expects a great
SMITH'S
Bar-B-Q
GARAGE
vances of a sexy Korean nurse, with a
look that clearly says, "Lips that touch
BMOC
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The freshest new taste in
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In
it.
TUBBY'S
THE
even clods who rejoice only in two- pers a number of commie planes.
of
many new
the
the hero atoned for all the carnage by
chucking cute Korean orphans under
the chin, and piously repulsing the ad-
from the University during this
important spot in its history. Let us
deal
and special events during hope that we make the most
year than in any previous year.
celebrations,
.v:.|.
MONTEAGLE

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